Bedeutung Blog

Category Archives: review

The globalization of religion

Richard Dawkins’s heart leaps up as high as any Romantic poet’s when he beholds a rainbow. But he has taken issue with Keats’s complaint that when scientists “unweave” a rainbow they spoil it. Mike King in Postsecularism ripostes that Dawkins is trying to “arrogate to science what is the proper domain of a quite different [...]
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Bacon agonistes

by John Richardson from The New York Review of Books To celebrate Francis Bacon’s centenary in 2009, Tate Britain mounted a retrospective exhibition that was subsequently shown at the Prado in Madrid and the Metropolitan Museum in New York. Bacon’s theater of cruelty was an enormous popular success at all of its venues, but especially in New [...]
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Commonwealth, by Michael Hardt & Antonio Negri — First as Tragedy, Then as Farce, by Slavoj Zizek

by John Gray from The Independent One of history’s most discredited ideologies is having a comeback – not as a political force but as a commodity in the marketplace. No longer confined to dingy meetings of ageing Trotskyites or the longueurs of the academic seminar, communism has been reinvented as a kind of intellectual cabaret act. The 20th [...]
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Presence of Mind

by Michael Wood from London Review of Books Roland Barthes died almost 30 years ago, on 26 March 1980, but his works continue to engage new and old readers with remarkable consistency. Books about him keep appearing: literary and philosophical essays by Jean-Claude Milner (2003), Jean-Pierre Richard (2006) and Eric Marty (2006), a gossipy biography of his [...]
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Unexpected tenderness

Michael Haneke’s Palme d’Or-winner ‘The White Ribbon’ is a tale of cruelty set in a north German village in 1913. Despite its monochrome austerity, Catherine Wheatley sees hints of a new softness in the director’s work “Have you any pride? You want to see how far you can go? My God, why don’t you just give [...]
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Axler's Theater

by Elaine Blair from the New York Review of Books One of the rare funny moments in Philip Roth’s recent novel Everyman (2006) takes place when the unnamed hero visits his parents’ graves in Newark. His health has been poor, his colleagues and friends have been dying, and though he has no reason to think that his [...]
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Afghanistan: the natural State

by Alex de Waal from The Times The hard-bought election in Afghanistan was a reality check for the United States and its allies, compelling them to look again at their promise of building a modern state in that country. After overthrowing the Taliban, Afghan exiles and their foreign backers assumed that they would put the aberration of [...]
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How messy it all is

by David Runcimanfrom the LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett The argument of this fascinating and deeply provoking book is easy to summarise: among rich countries, the more unequal ones do worse according to almost every quality of life indicator you can [...]
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Why Is She Smiling?

by Jay McInerneyfrom THE NEW YORK TIMES For the past 20 years or so, Richard Powers seems to have been engaged in a prodigious attempt to redress the imbalance of knowledge that was the subject of C. P. Snow’s famous “Two Cultures” lecture. That, you will recall, was the one in which Snow, a British scientist [...]
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Bristling with Diligence

by James Woodfrom the LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS There is what seems an interesting slip early in A.S. Byatt’s new novel. It is 1895. A young working-class man, Philip Warren, has been adopted by a liberal upper-class family, the Wellwoods. At the Kentish country home of Olive and Humphry Wellwood, a glorious Midsummer Party is in [...]
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Converts to Colonizers?

Gabriel Piterberg reviews Shlomo Sand’s When and How Was the Jewish People Invented?from the NEW LEFT REVIEWThe foundational myths of the state of Israel rest on the notion that, throughout history, the Jews have been descended from a single ethno-biological core of Judean exiles who had been removed from their ancestral lands in the first [...]
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