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Tag Archives: london review of books

Not Crushed, Merely Ignored

by Tariq Ali from: London Review of Books A Kashmiri lawyer rang me last week in an agitated state. Had I heard about the latest tragedies in Kashmir? I had not. He was stunned. So was I when he told me in detail what had been taking place there over the last three weeks. As far as [...]
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Jacqueline Rose on the Dreyfus Affair

Jacqueline Rose’s talk at the Asia Society on April 21 – organised by the London Review of Books on their 30th anniversary. Rose discusses parallels of the Affair with today’s political predicaments, including the role of the public intellectual. [audio http://bedeutung.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/dreyfus-affair-jacqueline-rose1.mp3] If the player doesn’t work, click the link below: Dreyfus Affair – Jacqueline Rose(1)
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Obama's War

A talk by Tariq Ali in New York on Monday April 19th – organised by the London Review of Books [audio http://bedeutung.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/obamas-war-tariq-ali.mp3] If the player doesn’t work, click below: Obama’s War – Tariq Ali
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Thatcher, Thatcher, Thatcher

by John Gray from the London Review of Books There wasn’t anything inevitable about David Cameron’s rise. If Kenneth Clarke had stirred himself into running something like a campaign when competing for the leadership with Iain Duncan Smith and been ready to appear more tractable on Europe; if David Davis had moved decisively in the immediate aftermath [...]
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Rebuilding Afghanistan

by Tariq Ali from the London Review of Books blog P.J.Tobia’s photographs of these monstrous buildings in Kabul convey only part of the horror. Their location is not too far from the slum dwellings that house the poor of the city, sans water, sans electricity, sans sewage, sans everything. A young photo-journalist from Philadelphia, Tobia supplied the [...]
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The Darwin Show

by Steven Shapin from The London Review of Books It has been history’s biggest birthday party. On or around 12 February 2009 alone – the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth, ‘Darwin Day’ – there were more than 750 commemorative events in at least 45 countries, and, on or around 24 November, there was another spate of [...]
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Uncovering Céline

by Wyatt Mason from The New York Review of Books 1. Louis-Ferdinand Destouches met Cillie Pam in Paris, at the Café de la Paix, in September 1932. Destouches was a physician who worked at a public clinic in Clichy treating poor and working-class patients; Pam was a twenty-seven-year-old Viennese gymnastics instructor eleven years his junior on a visit [...]
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Missing the Point

by Colm Tóibín from The London Review of Books From an early age, I have missed the point of things. I noticed this first when the entire class at school seemed to understand that Animal Farm was about something other than animals. I alone sat there believing otherwise. I simply couldn’t see who or what the book [...]
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I Could Fix That

by David Runciman from The London Review of Books In the final year of the last century, George Stephanopoulos, Bill Clinton’s one-time aide and press secretary, published a memoir of his time in the White House entitled All Too Human: A Political Education. Back then, it seemed like a terribly exciting book: 1999 was the year of [...]
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Presence of Mind

by Michael Wood from London Review of Books Roland Barthes died almost 30 years ago, on 26 March 1980, but his works continue to engage new and old readers with remarkable consistency. Books about him keep appearing: literary and philosophical essays by Jean-Claude Milner (2003), Jean-Pierre Richard (2006) and Eric Marty (2006), a gossipy biography of his [...]
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Post-Wall

by Slavoj Žižek from The London Review of Books It is commonplace, 20 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, to hear the events of that time described as miraculous, a dream come true, something one couldn’t have imagined even a couple of months beforehand. Free elections in Poland with Lech Walesa as president: who would [...]
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We simply do not know!

by John Gray from The London Review of Books The last two years, in which capitalism has suffered one of its periodic shocks, have given John Maynard Keynes a new lease of life. Events have demonstrated the limits of the theory that economies can be relied on to be stable if they are lightly regulated and otherwise [...]
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Bankocracy

by John Lanchester from the LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS The Murder of Lehman Brothers: An Insider’s Look at the Global Meltdown by Joseph Tibman Brick Tower, 243 pp, £16.95, September 2009, ISBN 978 1 883283 71 1 BUYA Colossal Failure of Common Sense: The Incredible Inside Story of the Collapse of Lehman Brothers by Larry McDonald, in collaboration with [...]
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How messy it all is

by David Runcimanfrom the LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett The argument of this fascinating and deeply provoking book is easy to summarise: among rich countries, the more unequal ones do worse according to almost every quality of life indicator you can [...]
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Bristling with Diligence

by James Woodfrom the LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS There is what seems an interesting slip early in A.S. Byatt’s new novel. It is 1895. A young working-class man, Philip Warren, has been adopted by a liberal upper-class family, the Wellwoods. At the Kentish country home of Olive and Humphry Wellwood, a glorious Midsummer Party is in [...]
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What Matters

by Walter Benn Michaelsfrom the LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKSIn the US, there is (or was) an organisation called Love Makes a Family. It was founded in 1999 to support the right of gay couples to adopt children and it played a central role in supporting civil unions. A few months ago, its director, Ann Stanback, [...]
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The Critchley-Žižek Debate

Remember the thrilling debate between Simon Critchley and Slavoj Žižek? Here it is again: 1. Simon Critchley publishes Infinitely Demanding: Ethics of Commitment, Politics of Resistance2. Slavoj Žižek writes in the London Review of Books: “Resistance is Surrender”3. T.J. Clark and David Graeber respond4. Žižek strikes back5. …and elaborates further in chapter 7 of In Defense [...]
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